2020 Hockomock League Boys Basketball All Stars

Below are the official 20020 Hockomock League Boys Basketball All Stars, selected by the coaches in the league.

Hockomock League MVP

Bryant Ciccio, Attleboro

Hockomock League All Stars

Bryant Ciccio, Attleboro
Qualeem Charles, Attleboro
Eric Mischler, Canton
Brandon Borde, Foxboro
Donald Rogers, Foxboro
Chris Edgehill, Franklin
Alex Fritz, King Philip
Matthew Boen, Mansfield
Sam Stevens, Mansfield
TJ Guy, Mansfield
Ben Blanchard, Milford
Jordan Darling, Milford
George Ladd, North Attleboro
Amari Brown, Oliver Ames
Obinna Ugwuakazi, Stoughton
Myles Grigalunas-Powell, Stoughton
Tyler Stewart, Taunton

Honorable Mentions:
Nick McMahon, Attleboro
Nick Cushman, Canton
Ryan Hughes, Foxboro
Brayden Sullivan, Franklin
Tommy Donahue, King Philip
Andrew Rooney, Mansfield
Colby Pires, Milford
Edan Kelley, North Attleboro
Ryan Burkett, Oliver Ames
Andrew Burton, Sharon
Ahmad Jahed, Stoughton
Josh Lopes, Taunton

2020 Hockomock League Girls Basketball All Stars

Below are the official 2020 Hockomock League Girls Basketball All Stars, selected by the coaches in the league.

Hockomock League MVP

Ali Brigham, Franklin

Hockomock League All Stars

Nyah Thomas, Attleboro
Kiara Cerruti, Canton
Sydney Gallery, Canton
Katelyn Mollica, Foxboro
Shakirah Ketant, Foxboro
Lizzy Davis, Foxboro
Ali Brigham, Franklin
Olivia Quinn, Franklin
Faye Veilleux, King Philip
Faith Roy, King Philip
Kayla Vine, Mansfield
Emma Lawrence, Milford
Amanda Kaiser, North Attleboro
Caroline Flynn, Oliver Ames
Caroline Peper, Oliver Ames
Shyanne Trinh, Stoughton
Kameron St. Pierre, Taunton

Honorable Mentions:
Meghan Gordon, Attleboro
Fay Gallery, Canton
Abby Hassman, Foxboro
Erin Quaile, Franklin
Brianna James, King Philip
Ashley Santos, Mansfield
Carly Ferreira, Milford
Regan Fein, North Attleboro
Meg Holleran, Oliver Ames
Kaitlyn Wallace, Sharon
Aliyah Wright, Stoughton

2020 Hockomock League Boys Swimming All Stars

Below are the official 2020 Hockomock League Boys Swimming All Stars, selected by the coaches in the league.

Hockomock League MVP

Timothy Luc, Taunton

Hockomock League All Stars

Matthew Marcil, Attleboro
Javier Frestler, Canton
Matthew Thompson, Canton
Brendan LaPuma, Franklin
Bleddyn Titmuss, Franklin
James Wu, Franklin
Connor Eck, Franklin
Derek Whyte, King Philip
Jake Hokanson, King Philip
Cam Stringfellow, King Philip
Matthew Grough, King Philip
Aden Schwartz, Mansfield
Gill Hobart, Milford
Ted Stearns, Milford
Jacob Desmond, Milford
Josh Kravets, Milford
Liam Bennett, Milford
Patrick Parlon, North Attleboro
Colin Monahan, North Attleboro
Ben Turner, Oliver Ames
Anthony Carraggi, Oliver Ames
Nicholas Wang, Sharon
David Bai, Sharon
Daniel Schnitzer, Sharon
Thanh Tran, Sharon
Tyler Tran, Stoughton
Timothy Luc, Taunton
Brady Callahan, Taunton
Martin Dafov, Taunton
Matthew Heather, Taunton

Honorable Mentions:
Colton Mangion, Attleboro
Ben Guerini, Canton
Thomas Perry, Jr., Foxboro
Daniel Gurge, Franklin
John Dionis, King Philip
Michael Peel, Mansfield
Tammo Guid, Milford
Alex Rogers, North Attleboro
Cormac Ganshirt, Oliver Ames
Nikkil Kload, Stoughton
Jonathan Trinh, Taunton

2020 Hockomock League Girls Swimming All Stars

Below are the official 2020 Hockomock League Girls Swimming All Stars, selected by the coaches in the league.

Hockomock League MVP

Morgan Foltz, Oliver Ames

Hockomock League All Stars

Jacqueline Lynch-Bartek, Attleboro
Ella Lynch-Bartek, Attleboro
Shauna Harney, Canton
Jessica Hart, Canton
Abby Gallagher, Foxboro
Megan Lathrop, Foxboro
Elizabeth Tang, Franklin
Alyssa LaPluma, Franklin
Katherine Chew, Franklin
Kathryn McGuire, Franklin
Megan Campbell, King Philip
Morgan Sachleben, King Philip
Jessica Sullivan, King Philip
Catherine DiGiacomo, King Philip
Morgan Poppengarner, King Philip
Kyra Cavicchi, Mansfield
Eva Parsons, Milford
Morgan Foltz, Oliver Ames
Morgan O’Hara, Oliver Ames
Jennifer Buche, Oliver Ames
Samantha Streton, Oliver Ames
Ava Kelley, Oliver Ames
Emily Kelley, Oliver Ames
Sophie Hirtle, Oliver Ames
Cassandra Cronin, Oliver Ames
Kimora Peters, Oliver Ames
Muskan Kumar, Sharon
Cleo Zhou, Sharon
Cheryl Sung, Sharon
Shruthi Kaveti, Sharon
Angelina Lynch, Taunton
Tiffany Ye, Taunton
Marisa Gay, Taunton

Honorable Mentions:
Faith Morrison, Attleboro
Brianna Gilchrist, Canton
Gina Ouellette, Foxboro
Maia Wainwright, Franklin
Brianna McMasters, King Philip
Mairead Shannon, Mansfield
Paige Reisman, Milford
Sophia Roukhadze, N Attleboro
Emma O’Hara, Oliver Ames
Kaylin Desmond, Stoughton
Macey Jorge, Taunton

2020 Hockomock League Boys Indoor Track All Stars

Below are the official 2020 Hockomock League Boys Indoor Track All Stars, selected by the coaches in the league.

Hockomock League MVP

David Peters, Stoughton

Hockomock League All Stars

Jonathan Chery, Canton
Zach Goldstein, Canton
Junior Sainvil, Canton
Cameron Sanchez, Canton
Deyontai Dennis, Canton
Nick Calitri, Franklin
Tyler Brogan, Franklin
Ryan Proulx, Foxboro
Michael Griffin, King Philip
Michael Norberg, King Philip
Eric DeLorenzo, King Philip
Nathan Farkash, King Philip
Noah Hurd, King Philip
Jovan Joseph, King Philip
Owen Mullahy, Mansfield
Andrew Williams, Mansfield
Jack Rivard, Mansfield
Emmett Ruote, North Attleboro
Kyle Sarney, Oliver Ames
Evan Connor, Stoughton
Anthony Pizzano, Stoughton
Clayton Rahaman, Stoughton
David Peters, Stoughton
Nathaniel Peters, Stoughton
Elisha Claude, Stoughton
Mark Edge, Stoughton
Christopher Ais, Stoughton
Jordan Emile, Stoughton
Patrick McManus, Sharon
Mason Benton, Sharon
Steven Westgate, Taunton

Honorable Mentions
Ethan Crosby, Attleboro
Kyle Downing, Canton
Adam Connolly, Foxboro
Camden Harrington, Franklin
Sean McCombs, King Philip
Mike Mullahy, Mansfield
Anthony Ghalbouni, Milford
Nick Taylor, North Attleboro
Rory McLaughlin, Oliver Ames
Mark Starovoytov, Sharon
Christian Ais, Stoughton
Ty Cali, Taunton

2020 Hockomock League Girls Indoor Track All Stars

Below are the official 2020 Hockomock League Girls Indoor Track All Stars, selected by the coaches in the league.

Hockomock League MVP

Lily Wetherbee, North Attleboro

Hockomock League All Stars

Kelly Neuendorf, Attleboro
Cassondra Stuger, Attleboro
Kamsi Igbobi, Attleboro
Bronwyn Mahoney, Canton
Jill Fenerty, Franklin
Bailee Ziolkowski, King Philip
Tessa Lancaster, Mansfield
Anna Buckley, Mansfield
Sarah Flanagan, Milford
Kerry O’Connor, Milford
Jenna Mastroianni, Milford
Kiyanni Simas, Milford
Lily Wetherbee, North Attleboro
Olivia Etienvre, North Attleboro
Cassidy Becker, North Attleboro
Jenna Gilman, Oliver Ames
Abby Hodges, Oliver Ames
Emily Meyers, Oliver Ames
Meghan Reardon, Oliver Ames
Madison Perry, Oliver Ames
Jada Johnson, Sharon
Elizabeth Lee, Sharon
Eliana Boxerman, Sharon
Taylor Saks, Sharon
Daphne Theiler, Sharon
Olivia Dias, Taunton
Nia Mainer-Smith, Taunton
Kerla Sylvestre, Taunton
Morgan Zakrzewski, Taunton
Victoria Gravel, Taunton

Honorable Mentions
Diana Blouin, Attleboro
Kayla Wong, Canton
Emma Dahl, Foxboro
Samantha Powderly, Franklin
Sarah Vigevani, King Philip
Katie Miller, Mansfield
Sarah Brogioli, Milford
Ari Preacher, North Attleboro
Grace Simone, Oliver Ames
Simone Dunbar, Sharon
Chinazo Odunze, Stoughton
Amanda Labrecque, Taunton

Sharon’s Cosgrove Named Coach of the Year at RIC

Jenna Cosgrove
Sharon alum Jenna Cosgrove instructs her Rhode Island College team in a game earlier this season against Roger Williams. (Courtesy Photo)

Josh PerryFollowJoshPerry


When Jenna Cosgrove took over the Rhode Island College program, the Anchorwomen had won only 19 games in the three previous seasons combined and had finished bottom of the Little East Conference with five wins in 2016-17. Three years later, RIC won 22 games (second-most in program history) and reached the conference championship game.

Cosgrove, who played basketball for four years at Sharon and then at Endicott College, was named the Little East Coach of the Year for bringing the RIC program back to the top of the league standings.

“It’s bittersweet right now because we just lost in the championship,” Cosgrove said in a phone conversation a few days after RIC’s 49-44 loss to Eastern Connecticut State in the conference title game. “In year three to take the team to the championship and receive an honor like this speaks volumes of the growing respect for the program.”

Despite 22 wins this winter, RIC just missed out on an at-large berth in the NCAA Tournament. Cosgrove still saw a lot of growth for the program this season. She said, “I tell the kids we now should be a top 25 team. It raises the standards really high and it’s exciting for the program. I think our girls will be fired up next year to try and come back and win a championship.”

Coaching is a family trait. Cosgrove’s grandfather Jack helped found the Pop Warner football program in Sharon, coached several sports, and the middle school field was recently named in his honor. Her uncle Jack is the winningest football coach in University of Maine history and is still active as the head coach at Colby College.

Her interest in the profession led to a sports management degree at Endicott and shortly after graduating from college led to her taking jobs coaching AAU basketball at Mass Premier and as an assistant for Sharon coach Kate Horsmann.

At the age of just 23, Cosgrove got the opportunity to be an administrative assistant and support staff for the women’s basketball program at Fordham. “I jumped at it,” she explained. “It was a big leap of faith for me because obviously I was transitioning from Sharon to the Bronx at 23 and I didn’t know anybody.”

She traveled with the team, helped out at games and at practices, and, after the head coach left at the end of the season, was part of the interview process for new coach Stephanie Gaitley. The Rams had gone nearly two decades without a winning record but Gaitley turned the Rams into perennial league title contenders and had 20-plus wins in six of her first eight seasons in charge.

Cosgrove became an assistant coach after three years and eventually was named recruiting coordinator. After seven years in the Bronx, she took another leap and became the head coach at RIC. She took her experience and a lot of what she learned from Gaitley to help turn things around for the Anchorwomen.

“That journey being in New York, that really defined me as a coach and I learned from one of the best in the business at that level, but I spent a lot of time there and it got me to this job because I wanted to be back home, I wanted to be closer to family,” said Cosgrove. “It got me back to my roots and to be a head coach.”

She added, “I learned how to change culture from [Stephanie]. When she took over that program, we were at the bottom of the Atlantic 10 and within three years we won an A-10 championship. When I got here, we were at the bottom and I knew we would need to bring in good players, which we’ve done, but a big part of it is building culture and building confidence.”

The first season in charge was tough, but RIC doubled its win total in year two, finishing 18-9 and making it to the LEC semifinal. This year was even better, RIC finished at 22-5. Cosgrove admitted that there was a lot to learn in her first head coaching position.

“Jumping from being an assistant to head coach taught me more in that first year about myself, but it’s the most rewarding experience and I love being a head coach and I wouldn’t change anything,” she said.

Her time as a member of the support staff at Fordham and especially her time in recruiting prepared her for the challenges that coaches at the DIII level face. With much smaller staffs, DIII coaches have their hands in have aspect of the program and Cosgrove said it was a “competitive edge,” although in the end coaching is still about being able to work with and get the most out of a group of student-athletes.

“It’s about being able to really relate to the kids and to motivate the kids and really have that close relationship off the court,” Cosgrove said. “I was a good athlete but I don’t know if I ever really reached my potential. Part of my desire to coach is to instill that in other kids and get them to reach their potential and maximize their opportunity.”

“t’s the player connection. It’s being able to impact a player’s life. I look at my season ending and my two seniors and those kids are going to be in my life forever, in terms of being able to help impact and change their life.”

Being in charge of a DI program is a typical ambition for anyone in the coaching profession, but Cosgrove isn’t looking ahead.

“Right now, I just live in the moment,” she said. “I’m not done here. I want to win a championship. I think going from DI to DIII gives a lot of perspective, you hit a stage where you do really value balance and I think I’m in a really good spot right now.”

RIC will be happy to have her coming back, hungrier than ever after getting to the program’s first LEC final since 2014.

Canton Boys, Girls Hockey Teams Named Co-Champs

Canton hockeyByRyanLanigan_2016FollowRyanLanigan_2016
 
 
 
With both the boys and girls hockey teams set to play for state championships on Sunday night, Canton was ready to host its own version of a “Garden Party.”

But unfortunately, neither team will hit the ice at the TD Garden. In fact, none of the six hockey games scheduled for Sunday will happen after the MIAA decided to cancel them due to the COVID-19 outbreak. The MIAA also canceled all of the basketball state championship games scheduled for Saturday.

With the cancellations, all of the teams that were scheduled to play in the final are considered co-champions. The Canton girl’s hockey team shares the title with Wellesley while the boys share the crown with Lincoln-Sudbury.

There will be a lot of anger, frustration, and disappointment among other emotions. Time will tell if this incredibly tough — and rather unprecedented — decision the MIAA made was the best choice. While it’s hard to swallow, keeping student-athletes safe is and should always be a top priority.

“We understand this is disappointing news however, this decision was made in the best interests of all our student-athletes, schools and communities,” read a statement on the MIAA website. “Schools who would have been participating in the State Finals will be considered Co-Champions.”

It’s tough to put in words how unfair it is to take away this opportunity from those who have earned it. One thing is for sure, it’s heartbreaking for all of the players, coaches, and team personnel involved that started this journey together back in December with hopes of reaching this point, only to have that opportunity taken away.

“I’ve been in the locker room in the past trying to console players after a heartbreaking loss but when we found out about the decision after practice, it was like nothing I’ve had to do before,” said Canton boys head coach Brian Shuman. “Sadness, frustration, disappointment…the full gamut of emotions.

“I wish I had the right words to make them feel better.”

Over the past week, we’ve seen the professional sports leagues like the NBA and NHL postpone their current seasons due to the outbreak. The MIAA also announced that the start of the spring season will be pushed back at least two weeks.

As the week went on, school systems across Massachusetts starting to announce closures ranging from days to up to a month in some locations.

“It’s just really horrible for us and for our opponents,” Shuman said. “We both had remarkable seasons and we were both looking forward to closing it out on Sunday. It’s just really unfortunate, I’m really bummed out for the kids.”

The Bulldogs would have entered Sunday’s championship game with a record of 21-1-3, the lone loss coming to their opponent Lincoln-Sudbury back on February 12th. At the time, it snapped Canton’s 43-game unbeaten streak that dated back to the 2018-2019 season, a year in which the Bulldogs went undefeated and won the D2 State Championship.

While Shuman noted the goal was to always return to the Garden to try and defend the title, there has to be an extra layer of frustration that the Bulldogs won’t get a shot at avenging their lone blemish in a remarkable two-year stretch.

“The kids worked incredibly hard every single game, not just skating, passing, and shooting, but emotionally and mentally every single day was such a grind. Not just this season, but for two years. It requires such mental toughness and commitment. To go through that, and then to not have that final test or final opportunity to hopefully put the cherry in top of a remarkable run is overwhelming.”

Without the state championship game, it means the high school hockey careers have come to a close for over a dozen Bulldog seniors: Chris Lavoie, Tommy Vaughan, Jack Connolly, Dom Cammarata, Tommy Ghostlaw, Shane Marshall, Colby Ciffolillo, Timmy Kelleher, Owen Lehane, Johnny Hagan, Declan Pfeffer, Ronan O’Mahony, and Joe Cammarata.

The same goes for the six seniors on the girls’ team: Kaitlyn McLaughlin, Caroline Tourgee, Alexa Maffeo, Meg Aldrich, Rose Malloy, and Vicky Revanche.

It would have been the third trip in the past four years to the TD Garden for the Canton girls team. It would have been a chance for those seniors to skate together one last time, a chance to deliver the first state championship in program history.

Canton (19-1-4) would have entered Sunday’s D2 Final as the underdog against the top-seeded Raiders (22-1-0) but that hasn’t stopped the Bulldogs from winning before. Back in 2017 as the 14-seed, Canton gave a scare to top-seed Notre Dame Academy, and a year later, the Bulldogs nearly knocked off the Raiders in a one-goal game.

In the run up to the final, Canton outscored its three opponents 11-2 and knocked off #2 Norwell in the state semifinal.

Unfortunately, we won’t get to see if the third time would have been the charm for the Bulldogs.

Franklin and Foxboro Girls Earn Respective State Titles

Franklin girls basketball Foxboro girls basketball 
Josh PerryFollowJoshPerry


Both the Franklin and Foxboro girls basketball team were practicing on Thursday evening when the news filtered through that both of their seasons had ended with a victory, although neither got the opportunity to complete their impressive seasons by taking the floor in a state championship game.

The MIAA announced early Thursday evening that it was canceling the state championship basketball games originally slated to be played on Saturday in Worcester out of concern for the COVID-19 pandemic. The six hockey state championship games scheduled for Sunday at the TD Garden were also canceled and the beginning of the spring season has been postponed for at least two weeks.

With the decision to cancel the finals, the teams that had reached this stage were declared co-champions. Foxboro will share the Div. 2 title with West champion Taconic, earning the Warriors a second state title in three seasons. Franklin finishes its season at 25-0 and will share the Div. 1 crown with North champion Andover, claiming the first state title in program history and widely regarded as the top team in the state.

For both teams, it is hard not feel the season’s end and the state titles were anti-climactic after the excitement of winning four or five tournament games.

“I got up at 3:30 this morning to start watching film because I didn’t know if we were going to be able to practice on Friday or if they were doing team stuff, there were just no details,” said Foxboro coach Lisa Downs. “So, I went from watching film in the middle of the night to my day job to practice and then I got the call. It was like, ‘what just happened?’ It just feels like a bad dream.”

Franklin coach John Leighton said, “They wanted to be able to get some closure and finish what they started and that will never come. They were frustrated, but they knew it might be coming. We practiced today more hopeful than optimistic.”

The players were understandably disappointed with the decision, although, as Leighton explained, there had been discussion about not having the finals for several days.

“One of the things we always talk about is ‘control what you can control’ and that’s usually fouls and effort but we talked about this all week too,” he said. “On Tuesday, the tournament director even came up to me and said, ‘Hope you get to play on Saturday.’ So we kind of had a hint that it might happen.”

Downs was grateful that her team was at least able to experience playing at the TD Garden, after being denied that chance because of a snowstorm during the 2018 state title season.

“I think it would’ve been so much worse if we hadn’t gotten to play at the Garden,” she said. “Yesterday I thought, okay we’re probably going to be playing in an empty gym, which sucks but at least they get to play the game. The girls don’t understand, you know, they’re 17-year-old kids. They’re just like, ‘They can take everyone’s temperature.’”

Franklin was start-to-finish the top-ranked team in the state. The Panthers made history last year by reaching the state semifinal, but came out this winter with renewed focus and raced through an unbeaten season, which included wins over D2 champion Foxboro, D1 South champion, Bridgewater-Raynham, and D4 champion Cathedral.

“We became really hard to beat,” said Leighton. “They were always hungry to get better Even last game, when we walked off the court they weren’t super happy. They knew it wasn’t their best game and they couldn’t wait to go play another.”

The state championship run was also the coronation of senior center Ali Brigham’s career with the Panthers. She finished as the top scorer in not only the program’s history, but the school’s history as well. Leighton credits the George Washington-commit with raising the profile of the program and making them into a perennial state power.

Leighton said, “She’s changed the program. The expectation of the kids who are going to come play basketball at Franklin has changed. She chose to stay all four years. That was selfless of her and her play this season was selfless. It says a lot about who she is as a kid.”

Foxboro finished the season 24-2 and on a 15-game win streak, which included a difficult run through the South sectional, knocking off Pembroke (which beat the Warriors in last year’s semifinal), Old Rochester, and Hingham. Defense was the key, as Foxboro allowed the second-fewest points per game in the league this season (37.6) and bettered that average in the playoffs (36.8).

“I don’t want everything ending so abruptly to overshadow that these girls were able to go 24-2,” said Downs. “From last year getting pummeled in the semifinal and having basically the same group of girls and getting progressively better throughout the course of the season. In postseason, you could see they were where you’d want a team to be. We had just so many pieces to the puzzle that we haven’t had in other years.”

Due to the unfortunate circumstances surrounding the COVID-19 pandemic, neither Foxboro’s or Franklin’s season ended with the trophy and celebration at center court that typically follows winning a state championship, but both teams will be able to add another state title banner to their programs’ legacies.